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Program Evaluation in Crime and Delinquency

  • Robert J. Jones

Abstract

Societies whose posture toward criminal or deviant behavior is essentially retributive need not concern themselves with the assessment of the methods they apply to those accused of such behaviors. Such societies do not expect the convicted offender to “get better,” though they may hope or presume that one effect of the retribution (e.g., incarceration, loss of the offending bodily part) might be to limit the future occurrence of the behavior in question. The retribution serves as its own end.

Keywords

Program Evaluation Delinquent Behavior Behavior Analysis Correctional Evaluation Deviant Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.BIABH Study CenterAppalachian State UniversityMorgantonUSA

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