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Guanidines 2 pp 137-146 | Cite as

Urinary Excretion Rate of Guanidinoacetic Acid in Essential Hypertension

  • Yoshiyuki Takano
  • Fumitake Gejyo
  • Yoshio Shirokane
  • Moto-o Nakajima
  • Masaaki Arakawa

Abstract

The kidney is one of the major target organs in hypertension. Longterm persistent hypertension causes nephrosclerosis pathologicaly in 70–90% of patients1–2. Concerning the laboratory findings correlated with this pathological change, urinary micro-albumin (mAlb), ß-2-microglobuline (RMG) and N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) have been reported as early markers of renal damage3–4. Moreover, the production of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) has been reported to be decreased in renal disease5.

Keywords

Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Urinary Excretion Essential Hypertension Plasma Renin Activity Hypertensive Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshiyuki Takano
    • 1
  • Fumitake Gejyo
    • 1
  • Yoshio Shirokane
    • 2
  • Moto-o Nakajima
    • 2
  • Masaaki Arakawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department Medicine (II)Niigata University School of MedicineNiigataJapan
  2. 2.Bioscience Research Laboratory of Kikkoman CorporationNodaJapan

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