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Fractal Methods for Flaw Detection in NDE Imagery

  • Michael C. Stein
  • Warren G. Heller

Abstract

Detection and measurement of flaws play a major role in an emerging “fail-safe” philosophy of structural design and evaluation [1]. This philosophy allows the existence of flaws in parts in service but requires that the flaws be identified, measured and evaluated to determine if they could lead to catastrophic failure during the design life of the part. In this way greater use is made of the part, leading to considerable savings in materials and manufacturing costs. These savings come at the expense of the development of nondestructive inspection technologies that are required for flaw detection, identification and sizing.

Keywords

Fractal Dimension Fatigue Crack False Alarm Weibull Distribution Fractal Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael C. Stein
    • 1
  • Warren G. Heller
    • 1
  1. 1.The Analytic Sciences CorporationReadingUSA

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