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Labor Market Restructuring in Europe and the United States

The Search for Flexibility
  • Samuel Rosenberg
Part of the Plenum Studies in Work and Industry book series (SSWI)

Abstract

Over the past two decades, labor market conditions in many advanced industrial societies have dramatically changed. The relatively low levels of unemployment of the 1960s have been replaced by the high and, for the most part, persistent levels of unemployment of the 1980s.

Keywords

Labor Market Labor Market Condition Primary Sector Secondary Sector Labor Market Flexibility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samuel Rosenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsRoosevelt UniversityChicagoUSA

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