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Preliminary Evaluation and Report on Human Adrenal Medullary Grafting

  • Roy A. E. Bakay
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Abstract

“Brain Transplantation” is an area of high interest and heightened activity by neuroscientists, neurosurgeons, and neurologists. It has been called the “ultimate transplant” which reflects its perceived importance and utility. This is, in fact, a misnomer since the brain is not actually being transplanted but rather small fragments of neural tissue are being grafted into the brain. A specific tissue is being utilized to correct a specific deficit. Thus, for Parkinson’s disease, dopamine producing tissue is placed in the striatum. While the procedure is still capable of producing front page news, the technical aspects of the surgery are embarrassingly simple. Most of the sophistication resides in the knowing of who should have surgery, when in the course of the disease surgery should be performed, what tissue should be used, where the tissue should be placed, and how best to place the tissue. Incredibly, none of these issues have been totally resolved.

Keywords

Nonhuman Primate Adrenal Medulla Stereotactic Technique Front Page News Major Systemic Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roy A. E. Bakay
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.V.A. HospitalDecaturGeorgia
  2. 2.Department of Surgery EmoryUniversity School of MedicineAtlantaGeorgia

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