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Beer Increases the Longevity of Rats Fed a Diet Deficient in Copper

  • Leslie M. Klevay

Abstract

The origin of ischemic heart disease, the leading cause of death in the industrialized world, remains obscure. It has been suggested that copper deficiency or abnormal metabolism of copper is of prime importance in the etiology and pathophysiology of this disease (1–3). As moderate intakes of alcoholic beverages, especially beer, often are associated with decreased risk of death from ischemic heart disease or coronary artery occlusion (4–6), it was decided to test the hypothesis that consumption of beer could have a favorable effect on rats fed a diet deficient in copper.

Keywords

Ischemic Heart Disease Zinc Acetate Coronary Artery Occlusion Copper Deficiency Ventricular Aneurysm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 2.
    L.M. Klevay, The role of copper, zinc, and other chemical elements in ischemic heart disease, In: Rennert OM, Chan W-Y, Metabolism of Trace Metals in Man, Vol I. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1984: 129–57.Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    L. M. Klevay, Ischemic heart disease. A major obstacle to becoming old, Clin Geriatric Med, in press.Google Scholar
  3. 6.
    T.B. Turner, U.L. Bennett, H. Hernandez, The beneficial side of moderate alcohol use, Johns Hopkins Med J 1981; 148: 53–63.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 7.
    L.M. Klevay, Hypercholesterolemia in rats produced by an increase in the ratio of zinc to copper ingested, Am J Clin Nutr 1973; 26: 1060–8.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 19.
    L.M. Klevay, Cholesterotropic and cuprotropic chemicals, In: Mills, C.F., Bremner, I., Chesters, J.K., ed., Proceedings of the Fifth International Symposium on Trace Element Metabolism in Man and Animals–TEMA 5, United Kingdom: CAB, 1984: 180–3.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leslie M. Klevay
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Nutrition Research CenterUSDA, ARSGrand ForksUSA

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