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High Temperature Organic Adhesives

  • P. M. Hergenrother

Abstract

High temperature organic adhesives are required for joining metals, ceramics, plastics, and composites to themselves and to each other. These adhesives, and other materials that are required to exhibit good adhesion, are needed for use in a variety of applications in the aerospace, automotive, computer, electrical, household, and oil industries. The common requirement is thermal stability; but stability under other environmental conditions is also needed. In some applications, the use temperature is not the determining factor. Stability at high temperatures encountered during various processing steps (e.g., soldering) to fabricate a component is the important requirement. These processing temperatures can be significantly higher than the actual use temperature. In this article, high temperature organic adhesives are defined as materials that exhibit usable stength after long term aging (i.e., thousands of hours) at 232°C or short term exposure (i.e., minutes) at 538°C and higher.

Keywords

Hydraulic Fluid Tensile Shear Strength High Temperature Polymer Ethynyl Group Adhesive Work 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, NY 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. M. Hergenrother
    • 1
  1. 1.NASA Langley Research CenterHamptonUSA

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