The Use of Cognitive Tests to Assess Cognitive Impairment In Cardiac Surgery Patients: With Emphasis on the Clat Analogy Test

  • Allen Willner

Abstract

Cognitive impairment has frequently been reported in cardiac surgery patients, both preoperatively and postoperatively [1–38]. In preoperative impairment, the severe cardiac illness for which the surgery is required can impair cerebral circulation in some patients, with consequent tissue damage and impaired cerebral functioning. In postoperative cognitive impairment, cerebral damage can be related to perioperative conditions such as problems with the extracorporeal perfusion equipment, e.g. arterial line filters and/or oxygenators [35, 36].

Keywords

Sugar Filtration Neurol Bark Rosen 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allen Willner
    • 1
  1. 1.Hillside HospitalGlen OaksUSA

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