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A New Protection Scheme for High Current Density Magnets

  • X. Huang
  • M. A. Hilal
  • Y. M. Eyssa
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 35)

Abstract

The light weight superconducting magnets1,2 use high current density conductors and require internal energy dump for protection. The conductors and the structure are both heated during a quench and it is necessary that the energy absorption does not exceed their thermal limits. A new protection scheme is reported and analyzed in this paper. The magnet consists of two conductors cowound in parallel. When a normal region develops in one conductor current transfers to the other conductor driving it entirely normal which in turn drives the entire winding normal. Energy is absorbed uniformly both by the conductor and the structure thus limiting the temperature rise to allowable limits.

Keywords

Heat Transfer Coefficient High Current Density Critical Current Coupling Coefficient Protection Scheme 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    X. Huang, Y. M. Eyssa, M. K. Abdelsalam, L. O. El-Marazki, H. H. AbdelMohsen, M. A. Hilal, and G. E. Mcintosh, Structure optimization of space borne toroidal magnets, IEEE Trans. Mag. 25(2): 1858 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    X. Huang, Y. M. Eyssa, and M. A. Hilal, High current density aluminum stabilized conductor concepts for space applications, IEEE Trans. Mag. 25(2):1532 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    M. A. Hilal and Y. M. Eyssa, Self protection of high current density superconducting magnets, IEEE Trans. Mag. 25(2):1604 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • X. Huang
    • 1
  • M. A. Hilal
  • Y. M. Eyssa
  1. 1.Applied Superconductivity CenterUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA

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