Wireless Cryogenic Quartz Thermometer with High Resolution from 400 K to 4.2 K

  • K. Agatsuma
  • F. Uchiyama
  • T. Ohara
  • K. Tukamoto
  • H. Tateishi
  • S. Fuchino
  • Y. Nobue
  • S. Ishigami
  • M. Sato
  • H. Sugimoto
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 35)

Abstract

We have measured the temperature dependence of the resonant frequency of a quartz crystal resonator and found it to show really good properties as a cryogenic thermometer with high resolution without magnetic field dependence (up to 8 tesla at 4.2 K) covering the wide range from 400 K to 4.2 K. The quartz crystal resonator sliced either in the “LC” cut or in the “YS” cut from high quality synthetic single crystal quartz was tested and calibrated by using a platinum resistor, thermocouple (Au-0.07atom% Fe/ Chromel) and a germanium resistor under thickness shear mode of operation through either extended cable connection or radio echo telemetric transmission from the resonators. A wireless echo sensor system was constructed and applied to a wireless thermometer for an oxide high temperature superconductor. Temperature reproducibility of the quartz thermosensor is excellent within 0.4 ppm maximum (0.2 ppm typical; 0.002 K) when thermally shocked between room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature. The resolution reduces from about 1kHz/K at 300 K to about 4Hz/K at 4.2 K but about 8OHz/K at 4.2 K after improvement.

Keywords

Nickel Quartz Welding Platinum Helium 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Reference

  1. 1.
    R. Bechmann, “Parallel Field Excitation of Thickness Mode of Quartz Plates,” Proceedings of The 14th Annual Symposium of Frequency Contro1. 1960.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    D. L. Hammond, C. A. Adams, P. Schmidt, “A Linear Quartz Crystal Temperature Sensing Element,” Proceedings of the 19th Annual ISA Conference, 1964.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    T. M. Flynn, H. Hinnah, and D. E. Newell, “An Improved Cryogenic Thermometer, ” Advanced in Cryogenic Engineering, vol. 8, 334, 1962Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    A. G. Smagin and B. G. Mil’shtein, “Quartz Frequency Thermometer,” Instruments and Experimental Techniques, vol. 12, 932, 1970.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    G. Cataland and H. H. Plumb, “Calibration of Germanium Resistors at Low Temperatures (2–20 Kelvin),” Journal of Research of the National Bureau of Standards — A Physics and Chemistry, vol. 70 A, No. 3, 1966.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Agatsuma
    • 1
  • F. Uchiyama
    • 1
  • T. Ohara
    • 1
  • K. Tukamoto
    • 1
  • H. Tateishi
    • 1
  • S. Fuchino
    • 1
  • Y. Nobue
    • 1
  • S. Ishigami
    • 2
  • M. Sato
    • 2
  • H. Sugimoto
    • 2
  1. 1.Electrotechnical LaboratoryTsukuba, IbarakiJapan
  2. 2.Tokyo Denpa Co. Ltd.Ohtaku, TokyoJapan

Personalised recommendations