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A New Strategy for the Study of Intrathecal Immunity

  • E. Schüller

Abstract

In its normal state, the central nervous system (CNS) is protected from the circulating immune system. However, each neuro-immunological process can break this sanctuary by two different ways: (1) transudation, a pathological influx of proteins from blood; and (2) intrathecal production of the immune system proteins such as immunoglobulins synthesized by B lymphocytes or complement components by macrophages and probably astrocytes. These two processes can occur either separately or together: the basic question is thus to evaluate the respective contribution of each of these processes when one of these immune proteins is increased in the CSF.

Keywords

Multiple scleroSiS Multiple scleroSiS Patient Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Intrathecal Synthesis Serological Titre 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

IT

intrathecal

ITS

intrathecal synthesis

EID

electroimmunodiffusion

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Schüller
    • 1
  1. 1.Hôpital de la SalpêtrièreParis Cedex 13France

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