Multimedia and Intermedia Transport Modeling Concepts in Environmental Monitoring

  • Yoram Cohen

Abstract

Environmental pollution is a multimedia problem. Pollutants do not stay where they originate but are able to migrate across environmental phase boundaries and to disperse throughout our ecosystem. Consequently, environmental exposure and risk assessments must be multimedia based analyses. In this paper, some aspects of intermedia transport are reviewed in relation to multimedia transport modeling, environmental monitoring and exposure assessment. Finally, an assessment is presented of the key research needs in the area of pollutant fate and transport modeling.

Keywords

Convection Cadmium Chloroform Chlorinate Lime 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoram Cohen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical Engineering and National Center for Intermedia Transport ResearchUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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