Electrochemical Measurement Techniques

  • Werner Weppner
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 199)

Abstract

Phase relations, thermodynamic and kinetic data are among the most fundamental materials parameters. They provide information about the existing stable phases, stability ranges, non-stoichiometries, atomic disorder, energies of formation, and electronic and ionic transport properties. Many other materials properties are closely related to these quantities. In spite of the importance of these fundamental parameters, little information is presently known as may be easily recognized by looking at the small number of investigated phase diagrams of multinary systems. In addition, the precision of the parameters is getting more and more important since even very small variations of the composition may have a large influence on the materials properties. The activities of the components change rapidly for most solids as a function of the composition. Furthermore, the present tendency of miniaturization requires more carefully the consideration of stability requirements [1].

Keywords

Entropy Crystallization Zirconia Enthalpy Lithium 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Werner Weppner
    • 1
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für FestkörperforschungStuttgart 80Germany

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