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Can Soyasaponin I and Mono- and Bi- Desmosides Isolated from Mungbeans Serve as Growth Enhancers in Mungbeans and Lettuce?

  • G. R. Waller
  • C. F. Yang
  • L. F. Chen
  • C. H. Su
  • R. M. Liou
  • S. C. Wu
  • C. C. Young
  • M. R. Lee
  • J. S. Lee
  • C. H. Chou
  • D. Kim
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 405)

Abstract

Mungbeans (Vigna radiata L.) are a crop plant of economic significance in Taiwan and countries around the world. Recently they were found to produce mono- and bi- desmosidic saponins1–3, with soyasaponin I being dominant. Little is known about the biological activity of saponins on the plant that produces them, although some reports on allelopathic activity (both inhibitory and stimulatory) have been published for mungbeans4,5. Research showing the presence of steroid saponins in the plant kingdom and their significance to plant growth was reported6. Some of the earliest work was performed on steroid saponins7, where the growth rate of wheat embryos was approximately doubled by optimum concentration of saponins. The treatment of tomato seed and cereals with dilute solutions of saponins accelerated germination and increased the growth rate. Seeds of pea or corn absorbed water more rapidly in the presence of saponins with a corresponding increase of growth rate. Speculation7 is to why steroidal saponins increase growth of pea embryos by 40%. These effects may be due to some surface-active activity, which modulate the relation of water to embryos and seedlings in cultivars. It was determined that steroidal saponins exhibit strong auxin activity at very low concentration8.

Keywords

Mung Bean Steroidal Saponin Vigna Radiata Trifoliate Leaf Allelopathic Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. Waller
    • 1
  • C. F. Yang
    • 2
  • L. F. Chen
    • 3
  • C. H. Su
    • 3
  • R. M. Liou
    • 3
  • S. C. Wu
    • 3
  • C. C. Young
    • 3
  • M. R. Lee
    • 4
  • J. S. Lee
    • 4
  • C. H. Chou
    • 2
  • D. Kim
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment StationOklahoma State UniversityStillwaterUSA
  2. 2.Institute of BotanyAcademia SinicaTaipeiTaiwan
  3. 3.Department of Soil ScienceNational Chung Hsing UniversityTaichungTaiwan
  4. 4.Department of ChemistryNational Chung Hsing UniversityTaichungTaiwan
  5. 5.Asian Vegetable Research and Development CenterTainanTaiwan

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