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Reflectance Pulse Oximetry

Accuracy of Measurements From The Neck Of Fetal Lambs
  • R. Nijland
  • H. W. Jongsma
  • J. J. M. Menssen
  • J. G. Nijhuis
  • P. P. van den Berg
  • B. Oeseburg
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 388)

Abstract

Continuous fetal heart rate (FHR) monitoring is used to assess the fetal condition during labour. Unfortunately, FHR patterns are not always easy to interpret, with low sensitivity and specificity as consequence. Other continuous methods for fetal surveillance have been proposed during labour (e.g. transcutaneous pO2 and pCO2, and pH-monitoring), but are not widespread used.

Keywords

Pulse Oximetry Pulse Oximeter Fetal Sheep Fetal Lamb Fetal Heart Rate Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Nijland
    • 1
  • H. W. Jongsma
    • 1
  • J. J. M. Menssen
    • 1
  • J. G. Nijhuis
    • 1
  • P. P. van den Berg
    • 1
  • B. Oeseburg
    • 2
  1. 1.Perinatal Research Group and Department of Obstetrics and GynaecologyUniversity of NijmegenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Perinatal Research Group and Department of PhysiologyUniversity of NijmegenThe Netherlands

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