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Critical Oxygen Extraction in Piglet Hindlimb is Impaired After Inhibition of ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channels

  • Benoit Vallet
  • Benoit Guery
  • Jacques Mangalaboyi
  • Patrick Menager
  • Scott E. Curtis
  • Stephen M. Cain
  • Claude Chopin
  • Bernard A. Dupuis
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 388)

Abstract

Hypoxic vasodilation is a well-recognized and often studied response. In arterial smooth muscle cells, decreased Po2 between 80 and 30 Torr caused a strong hyperpolariza-tion (Grote et al., 1988). In vascular smooth muscle, activation of ATP-sensitive K+ channels by specific channel openers induces vasodilation through hyperpolarization of the cell membranes (Standen et al., 1989). In isolated perfused guinea pig hearts, glibenclamide, a potent inhibitor of ATP-sensitive K+ channels, prevents coronary hypoxic vasodilation and cromakalim, an ATP-sensitive K+ channel opener, mimics hypoxic vasodilation (Daut et al., 1990), which suggests that opening of ATP-sensitive K+ channels may mediate hypoxic vasodilation in guinea pig hearts. Likewise, in rat aortic rings we demonstrated that glibenclamide attenuated the endothelium-independent relaxation induced by a 30 Torr bath oxygen tension (Po2) (Vallet et al., 1994a).

Keywords

Oxygen Extraction Ischemic Hypoxia CTRL Group Arteriolar Tone Hypoxic Vasodilation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benoit Vallet
    • 1
  • Benoit Guery
    • 1
  • Jacques Mangalaboyi
    • 1
  • Patrick Menager
    • 1
  • Scott E. Curtis
    • 2
  • Stephen M. Cain
    • 2
  • Claude Chopin
    • 1
  • Bernard A. Dupuis
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Pharmacology and Intensive Care and INSERM U279University of LilleLilleFrance
  2. 2.Departments of Physiology and Biophysics, and PediatricsUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA

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