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Cytochrome Oxidase is the Primary Oxygen Sensor in the Cat Carotid Body

  • Sukhamay Lahiri
  • Deepak K. Chugh
  • Anil Mokashi
  • Sergei Vinogradov
  • Shinobu Osanai
  • David F. Wilson
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 388)

Abstract

The carotid body (CB) senses hypoxia of arterial blood and signals it by increasing the activity in the sensory nerve. Since glomus cells are the only elements that are innervated, by monitoring the activity of this nerve with P02 changes it is possible to gauze the oxygen sensing in this tissue. The consensus model is that upon 02 sensing the cell is depolarized which mobilizes Ca2+. This increase in intracellular Ca2+ increases the release of neurotransmitters which then act on the nerve endings to generate the signals. This neural signal then traveling to the brain-stem elicits various respiratory and cardiovascular responses. In fact, this tiny organ initiates the major respiratory reflex effects, because in it’s absence hypoxia decreases ventilation, and the animal succumbs to hypoxia.

Keywords

Cytochrome Oxidase Carotid Body Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation Glomus Cell Carotid Sinus Nerve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sukhamay Lahiri
    • 1
  • Deepak K. Chugh
    • 1
  • Anil Mokashi
    • 1
  • Sergei Vinogradov
    • 2
  • Shinobu Osanai
    • 1
  • David F. Wilson
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of PhysiologyUniversity of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Biophysics and BiochemistryUniversity of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA

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