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Estimation of Cerebral Blood Volume and Transit Time in Neonates From Quick Oxygen Increases Measured by Near-Infrared Spectrophotometry

  • M. Wolf
  • H. U. Bucher
  • M. Keel
  • K. von Siebenthal
  • G. Duc
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 388)

Abstract

Quick oxygen increases are used to estimate the cerebral blood flow (cbf) or cerebral haemoglobin flow (cHbf) in neonates by near infrared spectrophotometry (NIRS) (Edwards et al, Skov et al., Bucher et al.). One of the essential assumptions for the correct estimation of cbf by the Fick principle is, that the time a bolus of tracer needs to pass the cerebral compartment - the so-called transit time (tt) - exceeds 6s to 8s. This paper describes a way of estimating the tt.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Pulse Oximeter Cerebral Blood Volume Oxygen Index Integration Period 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Wolf
    • 1
  • H. U. Bucher
    • 1
  • M. Keel
    • 1
  • K. von Siebenthal
    • 1
  • G. Duc
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinic for NeonatologyUniversity HospitalZurichSwitzerland

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