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Antigen analogs as therapeutic agents

  • Jeff Alexander
  • Jörg Ruppert
  • Dawne M. Page
  • Stephen M. Hedrick
  • Alessandra Franco
  • Glenn Y. Ishioka
  • Howard M. Grey
  • Alessandro Sette
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 386)

Abstract

The immune system’s function is to protect us against invading pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, parasites, and even the runaway growth of cancer cells. T lymphocytes play a major role in these immune responses, and in most cases the outcome is beneficial, such as killing infected cells or helping B-cells produce antibodies. In many cases, medical science has been capable of augmenting or enhancing the beneficial immune responses. Successes are numerous. Vaccines are now available against viral diseases such as influenza, hepatitis, and polio, and against bacterial infections such as diptheria, whooping cough, and tetanus. Clearly, however, much more progress is required in developing vaccines efficacious against diseases such as cancer and AIDS.

Keywords

Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Myelin Basic Protein Major Histocompatibility Complex Type Affinity Threshold Inhibit Antigen Presentation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeff Alexander
    • 1
  • Jörg Ruppert
    • 1
  • Dawne M. Page
    • 2
  • Stephen M. Hedrick
    • 2
  • Alessandra Franco
    • 1
  • Glenn Y. Ishioka
    • 1
  • Howard M. Grey
    • 1
  • Alessandro Sette
    • 1
  1. 1.CytelSan DiegoUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biology and the Cancer CenterUniversity of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA

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