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Interior Point Methods for Combinatorial Optimization

  • John E. Mitchell
  • Panos M. Pardalos
  • Mauricio G. C. Resende
Chapter

Abstract

Interior-point methods, originally invented in the context of linear programming, have found a much broader range of applications, including discrete problems that arise in computer science and operations research as well as continuous computational problems arising in the natural sciences and engineering. This chapter describes the conceptual basis and applications of interior-point methods for discrete problems in computing.

Keywords

Interior Point Interior Point Method Linear Programming Relaxation Integer Programming Problem Quadratic Assignment Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • John E. Mitchell
    • 1
  • Panos M. Pardalos
    • 2
  • Mauricio G. C. Resende
    • 3
  1. 1.Mathematical SciencesRenssaeler Polytechnic InstituteTroyUSA
  2. 2.Center for Applied Optimization, ISE DepartmentUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  3. 3.Information Sciences ResearchAT&T Labs ResearchFlorham ParkUSA

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