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Impacts of Landscape Transformation by Roads

  • Laurie W. Carr
  • Lenore Fahrig
  • Shealagh E. Pope

Abstract

The transformation of landscapes by roads has spread rapidly with little consideration of the ecological consequences. Between 1986 and 1994, the number of vehicles increased 18%, to over 6 billion world-wide (United Nations 1997). In this chapter, we outline the ecological impacts of roads on biological conservation, from a landscape ecology perspective. In Section 13.2 we outline the relevant landscape ecological concepts, in Section 13.3 we review measures to compensate for negative impacts of roads on wildlife, and in Section 13.4 we outline principles for successful mitigation of landscape-level road effects. Finally, in Sections 13.5 and 13.6, we discuss existing knowledge gaps and suggest research approaches for filling these gaps.

Keywords

Traffic Volume Landscape Structure Mitigation Measure Landscape Connectivity Florida Department 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laurie W. Carr
  • Lenore Fahrig
  • Shealagh E. Pope

There are no affiliations available

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