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Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment

  • Paul J. Hanson
  • Michael A. Huston
  • Donald E. Todd
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 166)

Abstract

The Walker Branch Watershed (∼100 ha), located at 35°58′ N latitude and 84°17′ W longitude, is a part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) National Environmental Research Park near Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Johnson and Van Hook 1989). Long-term (50-year) mean annual precipitation is 1352 mm, and mean annual temperature is 14.2°C. The soils are primarily Typic Paleudults derived from dolomitic bedrock. The soils are highly weathered and very deep (> 10 m) on ridge tops and therefore retain little evidence of their carbonate parent material. Plant-extractable water (water held between 0 and − 2.5 MPa) for the upper meter of soil is approximately 183 mm. A large fraction of this water (44%) is held in the upper 0.35 m of the soil profile, where 74% of all fine roots in the upper 0.90 m of the profile are located (Joslin and Wolfe 1998; Chapter 16, this volume). Depth to bedrock at this location is approximately 30 m (McMaster 1967), and deep rooting may be a source of some water.

Keywords

Slope Position Ozone Exposure Ambient Plot Covariate Rank Throughfall Exclusion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul J. Hanson
  • Michael A. Huston
  • Donald E. Todd

There are no affiliations available

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