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Treatment of Shock and Trauma States: Use of Cardiorespiratory Patterns to Define Therapeutic Goals, Predict Survival, and Titrate Therapy

  • William C. Shoemaker

Abstract

For maximal effectiveness, therapy should be directed against the basic underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms and toward optimal physiologic values. Therapy should be given vigorously in the early stages where it is most effective, as no amount of belated therapy can be expected to compensate for previous failure to recognize the insidious onset of shock. The major problems are to define with precision the pathophysiologic mechanisms and the therapeutic goals so that the therapy may be given in the optimal order and be titrated to ensure maximal survival.

Keywords

Cardiac Index Central Venous Pressure Pulmonary Vascular Resistance Sequential Pattern Stroke Work 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • William C. Shoemaker
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryHarbor General HospitalTorranceUSA
  2. 2.University of California at Los Angeles School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA

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