Mechanical Ventilators: Critical Assessment and Methods of Use

  • B. W. Kirk
  • W. L. Mackeen

Abstract

We use a “consumer-report” format in this chapter to present information on a variety of ventilators. Given a limitless budget, we would buy the most versatile, reliable, and powerful ventilator available. Where funds are limited, however, the physician may have great difficulty deciding what is best in terms of his needs and the funds available. Furthermore, there has as yet been no attempt to critically evaluate each new ventilator by an unbiased central agency, and comparisons based on manufacturers’ claims can be misleading.

Keywords

Europe 

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References

  1. 1.
    Mills, M. (1973). Problems with mechanical ventilators. Anesth. Analg. Curr. Res. 52:747–752.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Mushin, W. W., Rendell-Baker, L., Thompson, P., and Mapleson, W. W. (1969). Automatic Ventilation of the Lungs. Second Edition, Oxford: Blackwells Scientific Publications.Google Scholar
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    Saklad, M. (Chairman, ISO Sectional Committee ISO/TC 121/WG3). Proposed ISO standard specifications for breathing machines for medical use. To be published by American National Standards Institute, New York.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. W. Kirk
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. L. Mackeen
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of MedicineUniversity of ManitobaWinnipegCanada
  2. 2.Department of Respiratory Technology and Intensive Care UnitHealth Sciences CentreWinnipegCanada

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