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Temperature-Sensitive Viruses: Possible Role in Chronic and Inapparent Infections

  • Julius S. Youngner
Conference paper

Abstract

For the last 5 years my colleagues and I have been working on cell culture models of persistent viral infections. Currently, our hypothesis concerns the establishment and maintenance of certain persistent infections. We believe that in the process of infection with wild-type (wt) virulent viruses that later lead to persistent infection there is frequently a selection of tempera- ture-sensitive (ts) virus mutants uniquely suited to maintain the persistent infection.

Keywords

Newcastle Disease Virus Persistent Infection Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Measle Virus Infection Newcastle Disease Virus Infection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julius S. Youngner

There are no affiliations available

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