In situ fluorescence spectroscopy of pesticides and other organic pollutants

  • Victorin N. Mallet
  • Paul E. Belliveau
  • Roland W. Frei
Part of the Residue Reviews book series (RECT, volume 59)

Abstract

Fluorescence spectroscopy is well regarded as an analytical tool because of its excellent sensitivity and added selectivity, as compared to classical colorimetric methods. Nevertheless, its application to organic residue analysis has been somewhat limited due to the fact that not too many pollutants are very fluorescent and that many naturally occurring compounds interfere. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC), on the other hand, is well established as a cleanup and separation technique for residues and direct determination of fluorescent materials on TLC plates is now possible with good accuracy with the new line of chromatogram spectrofluorometers on the market. Consequently, a combination of TLC and fluorescence spectroscopy should prove a valuable asset as an analytical technique provided organic pollutants can be made to fluoresce.

Keywords

Quercetin Bromine Rutin Flavonol Kaempferol 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Victorin N. Mallet
    • 1
  • Paul E. Belliveau
    • 2
  • Roland W. Frei
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversité de MonctonMonctonCanada
  2. 2.Department of the EnvironmentWater Control LaboratoriesMonctonCanada
  3. 3.Sandoz Ltd.BasleSwitzerland

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