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Consequences of lead in the ambient environment: An analysis

  • Robert M. Bethea
  • Nancy J. Bethea
Conference paper
Part of the Residue Reviews book series (RECT, volume 54)

Abstract

This report is composed of two parts: a discussion of the real and potential problems associated with airborne lead and an analysis of the position of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in support of a national ambient air quality standard of two εg of lead/m3. EPA proposes to achieve this standard by controlling the use of lead additives in gasoline.

Keywords

Environmental Protection Agency Lead Concentration Lead Level Street Dust Blood Lead Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. Bethea
  • Nancy J. Bethea
    • 1
  1. 1.Chemical Engineering Department and Department of Biological SciencesTexas Tech UniversityLubbockUSA

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