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Reduction of pesticide residues in food crops by processing

  • J. R. Geisman
Conference paper
Part of the Residue Reviews book series (RECT, volume 54)

Abstract

Agricultural productivity has been on the increase since the 1920’s and will likely continue to increase. Much of this increased yield is due to improved control of plant pests. Control of plant pests has become possible through the proper use of pesticides. It seems likely that control measures will continue to be improved with increasing specificity of pesticides. Concomitantly, the quality of food commodities has also improved which may be directly associated with improved human health.

Keywords

Unit Operation Pesticide Residue Sweet Corn Green Bean Insecticide Residue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. R. Geisman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of HorticultureThe Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development CenterColumbusUSA

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