Plant Nutrient Limitations of Tundra Plant Growth

  • Albert Ulrich
  • Paul L. Gersper
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 29)

Abstract

Plant growth and primary production in tundra areas can be limited by the availability of inorganic nutrients as shown by Warren-Wilson (1957), Schultz (1964), and others. More recently, attention has focused on the experimental response of tundra plants to enrichment by N (Haag, 1974) and/or P (Chapin, 1978; Chapin et al., 1975; McKendrick et al., 1978). Rigorous attempts to determine nutrient deficiencies in situ, however, have not been undertaken in tundras.

Keywords

Biomass Zinc Toxicity Phosphorus Magnesium 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert Ulrich
  • Paul L. Gersper

There are no affiliations available

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