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Interpersonal Relationships and Behavioral Homeostasis

  • Wilford Wayne Spradlin
  • Patricia Bavely Porterfield
Part of the Heidelberg Science Library book series (HSL)

Abstract

The brain is continually involved in secretory activity— producing transmitters, enzymes and other hormonal substances. The interaction or equilibrium of those chemical substances is the cauldron from which the behavioral readout emanates. We may say that the brain, in conjunction with all other organ systems in the body, secretes behavior. This is analagous to the secretory activity of the kidney the enzyme activity of which, in conjunction with various chemical agents in the perfusing blood flow, results in the output of urine. The secretion (or perhaps excretion) of the brain depends on informational input as well as chemical activity.

Keywords

Interpersonal Relationship Emotional Arousal Interpersonal Skill Intense Concentration Behavioral Economy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wilford Wayne Spradlin
    • 1
  • Patricia Bavely Porterfield
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Behavioral Medicine and PsychiatryUniversity of Virginia School of MedicineCharlottesvilleUSA

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