Advertisement

Origin, Transformation, and Stability of Clay Particles

  • Hans Jenny
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 37)

Abstract

Hard rocks weather and turn into substrates for higher plants. The mineral assemblies of rocks are fragmentized to gravels, sands, and silts and transform themselves chemically to clay particles, molecules, and ions. Clay formation is a cardinal pedogenic process.

Keywords

Soil Solution Clay Particle Silicate Clay Solubility Product Stability Field 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Alexander, G. B., W. M. Heston, and R. K. Iler. 1954. J. Phys. Chem. 58: 453–455.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Anderson, M. S., and S. Mattson. 1926. Properties of the Colloidal Soil Material. U.S.D.A. Bull. 1452. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Beckwith, R. S., and R. Reeve. 1963. Aust. J. Soil Res. 1: 157–168.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Berner, R. A. 1971. Principles of Chemical Sedimentology. McGraw-Hill, New York.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Berry, L. G., and B. Mason. 1959. Mineralogy Concepts, Descriptions, Determinations. Freeman, San Francisco.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Bohn, H. L. 1967. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 31: 641–644.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Caillère, S., and S. Hénin. 1965. In Experimental Pedology, E. G. Hallsworth and D. V. Crawford, eds., pp. 99–112. Butterworths, London.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Cairns-Smith, A. G. 1971. The Life Puzzle. Toronto Univ. Press, Toronto.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Correns, C. W. 1940. Chem. Erde 13: 92–96.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Dixon, J. B., and S. B. Weed (eds.). 1977. Minerals in Soil Environments. Soil Sci. Soc. Am., Madison, Wisc.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Evans, W. D. 1965. In Experimental Pedology, E. G. Hallsworth and D. V. Crawford, eds., pp. 14–27. Butterworths, London.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Fox, R. L., J. A. Silva, D. R. Younge, D. L. Pluckett, and G. D. Sherman. 1967. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 31: 775–779.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Frink, C. R., and M. Peech. 1963. Inorg. Chem. 2: 473–478.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Garrels, R. M., and C. L. Christ. 1965. Solutions, Minerals, and Equilibria. Harper and Row, New York.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Gedroiz, K. K. 1931. Kolloidchem. Beih. 317-448.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Hartman, H. 1975. J. Mol. Evol. 4: 359–370.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Hénin, S., and G. Pedro. 1965. In Experimental Pedology, E. G. Hallsworth and D. V. Crawford, eds., pp. 29–39. Butterworths, London.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Kelley, W. P., and S. M. Brown. 1939. J. Am. Soc. Agron. 31: 41–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Kelley, W. P., W. H. Dorc, and S. M. Brown. 1931. Soil Sci. 31: 25–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Kittrick, J. A. 1977. In Minerals in Soil Environments, J. B. Dixon and S. B. Weed, eds., pp. 1–25. Soil Sci. Soc. Am., Madison, Wisc.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Krauskopf, K. B. 1967. Introduction to Geochemistry. McGraw-Hill, New York.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Loughhann, F. C. 1969. Chemical Weathering of the Silicate Minerals. Elsevier, Amsterdam.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Marshall, C. E. 1977. The Physical Chemistry and Mineralogy of Soils. Wiley, New York.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Mattson, S. 1930. Soil Sci. 30: 459–495.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Mitchell, B. D. 1962. In Genese et synthèse des argiles, pp. 139–147. Centre Nat. Res. Sci., Paris.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Mortland, M. M., K. Lawton, and G. Uehara. 1956. Soil Sci. 82: 477–481.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Norgren, J. A. 1973. Opal phytolyths as indicators of soil age and vegetative history. Ph.D. thesis, Oregon State Univ., Corvallis.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Okamoto, G., T. Okura, and K. Goto. 1957. Geochim Cosmochim. Acta 12: 123–132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Rausell-Colom, J. A., et al. 1965. In Experimental Pedology, E. G. Hallsworth and D. V. Crawford, eds., pp. 40–72, 92-96. Butterworths, London.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Riquier, J. 1960. Int. Congr. Soil Sci. 7th 4: 425–431.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Schellmann, W. 1964. Geol Jahrb. 81: 645–678.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Schwertmann, U., and R. M. Taylor. 1977. In Minerals in Soil Environments, J. B. Dixon and S. B. Weed, eds., pp. 145–180. Soil Sci. Soc. Am., Madison, Wisc.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Sillén, L. G., and H. E. Martwell. 1964. Chem. Soc, London, Spec. Publ. 17, 754 pp.Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Spyridakis, D. E., G. Chesters, and S. A. Wilde. 1967. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 31: 203–210.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. 35.
    Tardy, Y., G. Bocquier, H. Paquet, and G. Millot. 1973. Geoderma 10: 271–284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. 36.
    Van Schuylenborgh, J. 1965. In Experimental Pedology, E. G. Hallsworth and D. V. Crawford, eds., pp. 113–125. Butterworths, London.Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    Wada, K. 1977. In Minerals in Soil Environments, J. B. Dixon and S. B. Weed, eds., pp. 603–638. Soil Sci. Soc. Am., Madison, Wisc.Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Wiegner, G. 1921. Boden und Bodenbildung. T. Steinkopff, Dresden.Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    Wildman, W. E., L. D. Wittig, and M. L. Jackson. 1971. Am. Min. 56: 587–602.Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    Wilding, L. P., N. E. Smeck, and L. R. Drees. 1977. In Minerals in Soil Environments, J. B. Dixon and S. B. Weed, eds., pp. 471–552. Soil Sci. Soc. Am., Madison, Wisc.Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    Wilson, M. J. 1970. Clay Minerals 8: 291–303.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hans Jenny
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant and Soil Biology, College of Natural ResourcesUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

Personalised recommendations