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State Factor Topography

  • Hans Jenny
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 37)

Abstract

The immense tectonic plates that make up the Earth’s outer shell may slide beneath one another and initiate volcanos or collide with each other and push up and fold mountain ranges. Precipitation decimates the peaks, erodes the hill soils, and covers the valleys with new parent materials.

Keywords

Soil Erosion Depth Function Capillary Rise Bermuda Grass Silty Clay Loam 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hans Jenny
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant and Soil Biology, College of Natural ResourcesUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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