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Biosynthesis of Rat Apolipoprotein E

  • Godfrey S. Getz
  • Rick Hay
  • Catherine Reardon
Conference paper

Abstract

Apolipoprotein E biosynthesis is of particular interest for several reasons. It is a major apolipoprotein of both primary lipoproteins secreted by the liver, namely VLDL and nascent HDL (Marsh 1976; Felker et al. 1977). Unlike the other major apolipoproteins which are made in both the liver and the intestine, significant amounts of apolipoprotein E do not appear to be made in the intestine (Wu and Windmueller 1979). Apolipoprotein E exhibits a genetically influenced polymorphism, which may have a relationship to certain forms of dyslipoproteinemia (Utermann et al. 1977). The plasma concentration of apolipoprotein E and its distribution amongst lipoprotein fractions is significantly modified by the feeding of cholesterol to several species, including rat (Mahley and Holcombe 1977; Weisgraber et al. 1977) and man (Mahley et al. 1978). The most pronounced changes are in the formation of B-VLDL, enriched in apolipoprotein E, and of relatively large quantities of HDLC, in which apolipoprotein E is the major apoprotein. The latter lipoprotein shows particular affinity for the low density lipoprotein receptor of fibroblasts in culture (Innerarity and Mahley 1978) and readily transports cholesterol into the cell, effecting the same regulation of intracellular cholesterol metabolism first described in association with the incorporation of LDL cholesterol into the cell (Innerarity and Mahley 1978; Goldstein and Brown 1977).

Keywords

Translation Product Orotic Acid Major Apolipoprotein Major Apoprotein Polysome Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Godfrey S. Getz
  • Rick Hay
  • Catherine Reardon

There are no affiliations available

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