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Tunable Laser Systems

  • M. J. Wirth
Chapter
  • 50 Downloads
Part of the Contemporary Instrumentation and Analysis book series (CIA)

Abstract

In the first decade in the development of lasers, output was achieved from a variety of gain media, but only at discrete wavelengths. Many interesting new experiments became possible; however, applications of lasers to chemical studies were limited to cases in which there was a coincidence between the absorption spectra and laser output. The availability of continuously tunable lasers has had an immediate impact on chemical applications because it has become possible both to select a laser that operates in a desired spectral region and to scan the spectrum. Presently, tunable lasers that are commercially available include dye lasers, which cover the entire visible region, and diode lasers and F-center lasers, which together cover most of the infrared region.

Keywords

Diode Laser Gain Medium Free Electron Laser Tunable Laser Pump Source 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The HUMANA Press Inc. 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. Wirth
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA

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