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Geographic Variation and Behavioral Flexibility in Milkweed Bug Life Histories

  • Hugh Dingle
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

The evolution of life histories is atopic of great interest among evolutionary ecologists. The reasons are clear. Patterns of survival and of production of young determine the number of descendants in succeeding generations and hence fitness. Traditionally investigators have used mean values of life table statistics to investigate life history strategies, and indeed much current theory is based on the use of means and on assumptions that constant percentages of individuals breed even in fluctuating environments (reviewed in Stearns 1976). An example of the theory so generated is the much discussed concept of r- and K-selection. Implicit in such theories is the underlying notion that life histories represent some optimal genotype; variation and life history flexibility, whether genetically or environmentally influenced, have been largely ignored (see Nichols et al. 1976 for additional discussion).

Keywords

Life History Clutch Size Behavioral Flexibility Puerto Rico Life Table Statistic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hugh Dingle

There are no affiliations available

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