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Catecholamines as Predictors of Drug Response

  • W. A. Littler
  • R. D. S. Watson
  • T. J. Stallard
Conference paper

Abstract

Plasma levels of norepinephrine are a useful index of short-term changes in sympathetic activity (1, 2). We have measured plasma catecholamine levels and intraarterial blood pressure in hypertensive patients before and after beta-adrenoreceptor antagonism in order to determine how blood pressure and plasma catecholamines are altered by treatment.

Keywords

Chronic Treatment Plasma Norepinephrine Plasma Catecholamine Plasma Catecholamine Level Presynaptic Mechanism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. A. Littler
  • R. D. S. Watson
  • T. J. Stallard

There are no affiliations available

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