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Esophageal Complications of Surgery and Lifesaving Procedures

Chapter
Part of the Radiology of Iatrogenic Disorders book series (IATROGENIC)

Abstract

The esophagus, although well protected by other organs and structures in the posterior mediastinum, is easily accessible to endoscopy through the mouth. The same anatomic factors, however, make surgical approach difficult, necessitating thoracotomy, laparotomy, or both. Each is a major surgical procedure. The dual function of the esophagus as conduit for food and draining path for saliva makes complete removal of this organ impossible. Therefore, to provide a substitute esophagus by means of reconstruction has been the aim of surgeons for decades. New methods and improvement of old procedures are described frequently in surgical publications.

Keywords

Gastric Tube Distal Esophagus Total Laryngectomy Gastric Fundus Heller Myotomy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1981

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