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Sucrose Gradients: An Assay for DNA Damage

  • B. Palcic
  • L. D. Skarsgard
Conference paper
Part of the Topics in Environmental Physiology and Medicine book series (TEPHY)

Abstract

Exposure of cells to various physical and chemical agents often leads to damage in the cellular genetic material, DNA. Ionizing radiation, UV light, fluorescent light, microwaves, ultrasound, and heat have all been shown to induce DNA breaks. Many chemicals, including pharmacological agents, have also been found to cause a variety of injuries in DNA. Unrepaired or improperly repaired DNA damage may lead to a mutation, and, since mutagenesis and carcinogenesis are believed to be closely related, it can be assumed that agents which damage DNA are also capable of inducing human cancer.

Keywords

Sucrose Gradient Number Average Molecular Weight Preparative Ultracentrifuge Alkali Condition CH282 Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Palcic
  • L. D. Skarsgard

There are no affiliations available

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