Between Pragmatism and Maoist Visions of the Future. The Fourth Five-Year Plan, 1971–1975

  • Willy Kraus

Abstract

As usual, no plan figures were announced for the fourth plan period, which was to begin early in 1971. Based on reports from the provinces, it could only be surmised that a general economic growth rate of 7.5% per annum had been planned. The 5-year plan stood again under the well-known slogan of “agriculture as the base and industry as the leading factor” and was also referred to as the “plan of a new great leap forward” as had been the previous plan. Plan fulfillment and overfulfillment were to be guided by the motto: “In industry, learn from Taching; in agriculture, learn from Tachai; the whole nation should learn from the People’s Liberation Army.”1

Keywords

Sugar Corn Dust Estrogen Steam 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlarg New York Inc. 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Willy Kraus
    • 1
  1. 1.Abteilung für Ostasienwissenschaften, Sektion Wirtschaft OstasiensRuhr-University BochumBochum 1Germany

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