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Ir Genes pp 209-215 | Cite as

Isolation and Characterization of I Region Genes from the Major Histocompatibility Complex of the Mouse

  • J. A. Kobori
  • M. Steinmetz
  • J. McNicholas
  • M. Malissen
  • A. Winoto
  • C. Wake
  • E. Long
  • B. Mach
  • J. Frelinger
  • L. Hood
Part of the Experimental Biology and Medicine book series (EBAM, volume 4)

Abstract

The major histocompatibility complex on chromosome 17 of the mouse contains several families of genes which encode cell-surface recognition structures (1). One of these families, the immune response genes of the I region, is of particular interest because it regulates the ability of mice to make immune responses to simple antigens. A question of fundamental importance is how the immune response genes function. One hypothesis is that they are the genes encoding the T-cell receptors (2). More recent data suggest that the immune response gene products are in fact the Ia antigens, cell-surface molecules found on B cells, macrophages, and some T cells which have been analyzed serologically (3).

Keywords

Major Histocompatibility Complex Restriction Enzyme Site Immune Response Gene Cosmid Clone Recombination Point 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc. 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Kobori
    • 1
  • M. Steinmetz
    • 1
  • J. McNicholas
    • 2
  • M. Malissen
    • 1
  • A. Winoto
    • 1
  • C. Wake
    • 3
  • E. Long
    • 3
  • B. Mach
    • 3
  • J. Frelinger
    • 4
  • L. Hood
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of BiologyCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPasadenaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biological SciencesStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  3. 3.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of Geneva Medical SchoolGenevaSwitzerland
  4. 4.Departments of Microbiology and NeurologyUniversity of Southern California School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA

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