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Radioimmunoassay of the Vitamin D Metabolites

  • Bernard P. Halloran

Abstract

The preferred method for measurement of most hormones, and in particular the steroid hormones, is the radioimmunoassay (RIA).1,2 Radioimmunoassays have been developed and are in wide use for virtually all of the major steroid hormones. There are, however, other methods for measuring hormone concentrations; one of the most popular is the competitive protein-binding (CPB) assay. This type of assay makes use of naturally occurring binding proteins found in blood and various tissues. Although the CPB assay is very similar to the RIA, the latter offers certain advantages. For example, the proteins used in CPB assays are often less stable than antibodies, necessitating frequent preparation of fresh binding protein. In addition, normally occurring binding proteins do not always offer the same high degree of specificity as antibodies.

Keywords

Clinical Endocrinology Assay Tube Protein Binding Assay Standard Tube Waters Radial 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1983

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  • Bernard P. Halloran

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