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Cognitive Processes in Television Viewing: Description and Strategic Implications

Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

Television is now a common feature of the environments of children throughout the world. In the United States the average family operates television sets more than 6 hours per day (Comstock, Chaffee, Katzman, McCombs, & Roberts, 1978); children under the age of 6 view an average of 4-5 hours daily (Roberts & Bachen, 1981). The potential impact of this extensive exposure to television on psychological and behavioral development is now well established (Ball & Bogatz, 1972; Collins, 1982; Comstock et al., 1978; Stein & Friedrich, 1975). Television programs have been found to influence patterns of social behavior and self-regulation in laboratory and field experiments (e.g., Friedrich & Stein, 1973; Leyens, Camino, Parke, & Berkowitz, 1975; Rushton, 1979). Evidence from correlational field studies supports the relationship between viewing preferences and patterns of general behavioral tendencies, which may persist over long periods (e.g., Belson, 1978;Eron, 1982;Eron,Huesmann,Lefkowitz, & Walder, 1973;Huesmann, 1982). In addition, programs produced with a teaching intent, like “Sesame Street” and “The Electric Company,” have demonstrated effectiveness and efficiency in teach ing certain basic skills of literacy to children who view regularly (Ball & Bogatz, 1972;Watkins, Huston-Stein, & Wright, 1980).

Keywords

Television Content Television Viewing Television Program Typical Program Sesame Street 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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