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Memory Strategy Instruction with the Learning Disabled

  • Patricia E. Worden
Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

In any consideration of the various applications of memory strategy instruction in special populations, the learning disabled constitute an especially appropriate target group. Because of an uneven pattern of abilities (i.e., a specific deficit in processing letters, numbers, sounds, or word meanings, while showing normal performance in other intellectual areas), the learning-disabled child experiences repeated failure in the classroom and the learning-disabled adult suffers restricted socioeconomic opportunity. In a culture where universal literacy is expected and universal schooling is required, a person who nevertheless fails to achieve literacy is disadvantaged indeed. Moreover, the learning-disabled population contains an over-representation of minority individuals (Rosner, Abrams, Daniels, & Schiffman, 1981). In the sense that they are multiply disadvantaged, the failure of the American educational system to serve the needs of learning disabled individuals is a serious problem.

Keywords

Poor Reader Disable Child Serial Recall Disable Learner Learn Disability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1983

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  • Patricia E. Worden

There are no affiliations available

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