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Memory Strategy Instruction During Adolescence: When is Explicit Instruction Needed?

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Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

This chapter is about memory development and memory strategy instruction during adolescence. Although there is some debate about the age boundaries associated with this developmental interval (e.g., Conger, 1977), for purposes of this chapter we will consider people from roughly 10 to 22 years of age as adolescents. In doing so, it is recognized that we may be invading the territories that Waters and Andreassen (Chapter 1), Cook and Mayer (1983), and Bellezza (Chapter 3) cover in their discussions of children’s and adults’ strategy use. However, the real developmental significance of the discussion would be missed if it were not possible to compare the performance of teenagers with preteens and people slightly older. Thus, we apologize to the authors of the other chapters, but will poach anyway!

Keywords

Reading Comprehension Pause Time Strategy Usage Experimental Child Psychology Memory Strategy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

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