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Cognitive Behavior Modification: The Clinical Application of Cognitive Strategies

Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

The past decade has witnessed the emergence of a cognitive-behavioral perspective in the field of clinical psychology. Basic to this perspective is a clearly delineated emphasis on cognitions as components of behavior change. The systematic use of cognitions to alter behavior, affect, and thoughts constitutes a class of strategies that have demonstrated their clinical utility. The application of cognitive strategies for therapeutic purposes is not new to the clinician. As Rosen and Orenstein (1976) note, the modification of cognitions for initiating behavior change can be traced back over a century to Lewis and the “art of controlling one’s thoughts” (Lewis, 1875).

Keywords

Cognitive Behavior Modification Behavior Therapy Cognitive Therapy Cognitive Behavior Irrational Belief 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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