Problems in Classroom Implementation of Cognitive Strategy Instruction

  • Penelope L. Peterson
  • Susan R. Swing
Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to describe problems that need to be solved before cognitive strategy instruction can be implemented effectively in classrooms. At this point, these problems are not clearly defined because few attempts have been made to train students in cognitive strategies for classroom use. Moreover, in the few studies that have been done, researchers have not attempted to identify the specific variables that are related to unsuccessful classroom implementation of cognitive strategy instruction (see Peterson & Swing, Note 1).

Keywords

Expense Como Dick Weinstein Prose 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Penelope L. Peterson
  • Susan R. Swing

There are no affiliations available

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