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Mathematics Curriculum and the Needs of Computer Science

  • William L. Scherlis
  • Mary Shaw

Abstract

Computer science is concerned with the phenomena surrounding computers and computation; it embraces the study of algorithms, the representation and organization of information, the management of complexity, and the relationship between computers and their users. Computer science is like engineering in that it is largely a problem-solving discipline, concerned with the design and construction of systems. But the computer scientist, like the mathematician, must be able to make deliberate use of the intellectual tools of abstraction and of analysis and synthesis. The relationship between computer science and mathematics is very close and has been discussed at length in the literature. Two very interesting examinations of this relationship are [3] and [5].

Keywords

Computer Science Discrete Mathematic Mathematical Thinking Mathematics Curriculum Mathematical Reasoning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • William L. Scherlis
    • 1
  • Mary Shaw
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science DepartmentCarnegie-Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA

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