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p-Hydroxyphenylacetic Acid Concentration in the CSF of Patients with Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders

  • K. Kobayashi
  • Y. Imazu
  • T. Shohmori

Abstract

In recent years substantial evidence suggesting that p-tyramine (p-TA) acts as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the brain has been presented (Boulton, 1978; Boulton and Juorio, 1979; Juorio and Jones, 1981). Although the physiological roles of this amine in the central nervous system (CNS) are as yet unknown, it has been claimed that p-TA may be involved in the etiology of certain mental disorders (Boulton and Juorio, 1979; Boulton, 1980). However, there is little clinical evidence for this proposal. p-Hydroxyphenylacetic aid (p-HPAA), a major metabolite of p-TA in the brain (McQuade et al., 1981), has been detected and quantitated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)(Karoum et al., 1975; 1977), but a comparison of p-HPAA concentrations in the CSF of patients with various CNS disorders has not yet been made. We have recently developed a sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for the determination of p-HPAA in CSF (Kobayashi et al., 1982). In this communication we describe CSF levels of p-HPAA in patients with various neurological and psychiatric disorders with special reference to schizophrenia.

Keywords

Schizophrenic Patient HPAA Level Central Nervous System Disorder Hydroxyphenylacetic Acid Pseudobulbar Palsy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Kobayashi
    • 1
  • Y. Imazu
    • 1
  • T. Shohmori
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for NeurobiologyOkayama University Medical SchoolOkayamaJapan

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