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Hypodipsic Effects of ß-Phenylethylamine, Phenylethanolamine, N-Methylphenylethylamine and d-Amphetamine: A Temporal Analysis

  • J. Broadbent
  • A. J. Greenshaw
  • A. A. Boulton

Abstract

The trace amine phenylethylamine (PE) is an endogenous constituent of mammalian brain tissue (Durden et al, 1973). d-Amphetamine and PE are structurally similar, PE lacking only the α-methyl group of amphetamine. Administration of amphetamine results in a marked attenuation of food and water intake in many species (Bizzi et al, 1970; Holtzman and Jewett, 1971; Soulairac and Soulairac, 1970). Whereas PE has been reported to induce hypophagia (Dourish and Boulton, 1981), several reports have indicated that PE has no effect on fluid consumption (Dourish and Boulton, 1981; 1979; Thornton, 1980). No previous studies, however, have been specifically directed to an analysis of the effects of PE on water intake. The present study, therefore, attempted to reveal any hypodipsic effects of PE by employing a temporal analysis of licking within the test period. In addition to PE and d-amphetamine, the PE derivatives, phenylethanolamine (PEOH) and N-methylphenylethylamine (NMPE) were also included in this study.

Keywords

Water Intake Fluid Intake Spontaneous Motor Activity Fluid Consumption Compound Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Broadbent
    • 1
  • A. J. Greenshaw
    • 1
  • A. A. Boulton
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychiatric Research Division Cancer and Medical Research BuildingUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada

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