The Kinetics of Hydroxylation of Phenylethylamine, Amphetamine and Phenylalanine in Rodent Tissues

  • O. Callaghan
  • A. Mosnaim
  • J. Chevesich
  • M. Wolf

Abstract

Phenylethylamine (PEA) and amphetamine (α-MePEA) are closely related structurally and pharmacologically. Both amines elicit a number of similar clinical and behavioral (animal) responses, appear to use similar transport systems and to act via some common neurochemical mechanisms (1, 2). These observations have led several investigators to suggest that at least some of the α-MePEA actions are mediated via PEA, an endogenous amine (3) which has been conceptualized as a naturally occurring α-MePEA (4). We now report for the first time that both amines are p-hydroxylated, in vitro, by a common rat liver microsomal enzyme. It seems likely that PEA and α-MePEA might compete for the same catalytic site.

Keywords

Migraine NADPH Amphetamine 1_14C Tyramine 

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References

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Callaghan
    • 1
  • A. Mosnaim
    • 1
  • J. Chevesich
    • 1
  • M. Wolf
    • 1
  1. 1.The Chicago Medical SchoolN. ChicagoUSA

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